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Financial Planning

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Tools of the Financial Trade: Investing in Real Estate Makes Sense

I’ve said it once, I’ll say it again:  Real estate investment is an incredible financial tool.

Why use the term ‘tool’?  Because a tool can be used to help you do the job you want when you need it.  You might need a little instruction and practice to use it properly and with as little risk or harm to yourself as possible (ever bang your thumb with a hammer?!) but ultimately, a good tool can help leverage your time, effort and money to get a job done more quickly, efficiently and effectively.

And as any artisan or craftsman knows, having the just the right tool for the job can make a huge difference.  But a tool is just a thing.  It takes the energy and know-how of the person using it to make it work and to get the most out of it.  It’s also important to have as many different tools in your toolbox as possible – so that you can pull out just the right one exactly when you need it.

Real Estate Investment is a very versatile financial tool.  It can be used in different ways to accomplish different results.  If you can only carry or learn to use a few tools, it makes sense to pick ones that can be applied in as many situations as possible.

Investing in real estate as a financial strategy makes sense for many different reasons, including:

  • Wealth Building
  • Portfolio Diversification
  • Tax Advantages
  • Appreciation
  • Cash Flow
  • Community & Economy
Over the next few posts, we’ll take a closer look at each of these potential investment objectives and how Real Estate Investment can be used to help achieve them.  
 
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Why Women Make Great Investors

Women really do make great investors.  Why?  Because investing is about more than just math and numbers.

Women are becoming more and more deeply invested in their own financial success for many reasons:  Careers are being pursued and marriage is being delayed, divorce rates are higher than ever, single-moms and women who are the sole or main breadwinner in the family are increasing, cost of living is rising steadily, job security is virtually non-existent…the list goes on.  There are no guarantees in life and situations can change drastically in the blink of an eye.  Independence and self-sufficiency are more than just words; they are a gateway to freedom.  Women are no longer content or willing to be dependent on others for their quality of life.  

A lot of the Myths about Money & Women floating around out there are simply false.  Statistics show that women are blowing the stereotypes out of the water when it comes to money and investing:  Women are MORE likely to join a retirement plan, women save on average 10% MORE than men, women actually spend LESS than men, and women are MORE likely to diversify their investment portfolio.

True power and independence happen not when you HAVE money, but when you know how to MAKE money.

Just ask any lottery winner or divorcee who has blown through a divorce settlement trying to sustain a champagne lifestyle on a beer budget!  A lump-sum goes away pretty fast when there is nothing in place to replenish it.  The first step is learning about Assets & Liabilities; the next step is doing something with that knowledge.

As Rich Woman Coach Nichole explains in a video Coaching Tip about Women and Investing on Robert Kiyosaki’s Rich Dad website, there’s a lot more to successful investing than just numbers and calculations.  The Rich Woman coaches identified their top 5 characteristics that make women great investors:

  • Asking for help
  • Planning
  • Multitasking
  • Diligent research
  • Value shopping

Let’s take a closer look at these strengths, how they each contribute and add up to a Great Investor Profile:

Asking for Help.  Women typically know how to ask for help when they know they need it.  And in my experience, more often than not, they prefer to ask other women.  Have you noticed all the networks and clubs and resources that are geared towards supporting women in financial and business endeavors?  The Daily Worth, WomenOwned.com, Ladies Who Launch, National Association of Women Business Owners (NAWBO), My Wealth Spa to name a few.  Many of these were created or developed just in this past decade.

Women seek and value mentors that can support and assist them in a non-intimidating, non-judgmental forum.  Although men often view women’s lunchtime or evening gatherings as a sewing circle gossip session, women frequently use friends and colleagues as sounding boards for new ideas, thoughts and perspectives.  Brainstorming and round-table sessions are becoming more and more mainstream, even in the ‘Old Boys Club’ organizations because there is strength and power in teams and in seeking outside opinions and help.

Planning.  Most women become good planners by necessity.  Often in addition to full-time employment or business ownership, women take on, or inherit by default, the monumental task of running the household, juggling kids activities, making and keeping family appointments, planning and organizing family vacations, meals, etc.  It takes a lot of planning and organization to make sure everything runs smoothly from day to day and week to week.

Investing demands a similar kind of planning and organization to be efficient and get the most out of your capital.  The ability to make and stick to short and long-term goals is important but having a system to monitor and track it all is priceless, especially when it comes to finance and investing.

Multitasking.  Women are also known to be exceptional multitaskers.  Handling several issues or tasks at once is all in a day’s work for most women.  This translates well into the world of investing because there are always many different things going on in many different markets and across many different asset classes.

Women who are able to see various market factors and how they can affect an investment will be much more able to predict possible outcomes and proactively make adjustments as needed.  Diversification is also easily appreciated and accepted by women who are more likely to hedge their bets as opposed to going for the glory in a single ‘Hail Mary’ home-run move.

Diligent Research.  Women know how to do their homework.  They are used to budgeting, comparing prices, finding the right pediatrician, school, camp, mechanic, gardener, insurance, etc.  In finance and investing, this means that women know how to investigate and identify investments that will work best for them.

Investing involves a LOT of research.  ‘Due Diligence’ is an investment term that refers to the process of verifying data presented, investigating the investment parameters and terms so that the investor can make an educated decision to purchase or decline.  As a real estate investor, I screen and analyze literally hundreds of properties before finally deciding to offer in on one or two.  Diligently investigating the investment and the people involved is a crucial step in protecting your investment funds up front and finding a good fit for your specific purposes.

Value Shopping.  Warren Buffet once said, “Price is what you pay; value is what you get.”  Women seem to intrinsically know how to stretch a budget and shop for bargains.  They are aware of what’s available, what the going rates are and will go clear across town to get something at a discount.  Women know that it makes sense to get a designer gown at half price if they are willing to find and sew on a couple of missing buttons.

Investing for value or value-add opportunity follows the same principles as shopping for any kind of bargain.  You need to have a good idea of the general market value so that you have a benchmark to evaluate the investment you are looking to purchase and know when it’s priced below its true value, or when a few simple steps are all it takes to realize its potential (add value, like sewing on a button).  Once you know what to look for, it gets easier to spot the gems.

Finance and investing may seem like a spider’s web of intricacy and detail but understanding the rules and knowing how to filter out the junk makes it a lot easier.  Women have the skills and qualities to excel in the investment arena on their own terms.  Women really do make great investors!

~ Eleanor Roosevelt ~

Investing Takes Effort: Would You Let the Dealer Pick Out Your Car?

When purchasing a big-ticket item like a car or a house, don’t most people usually do a little research, shop around, compare prices and look for specific features that suit their needs?  Of course they do.  So why do many people not bother doing the same when it comes to their investments, especially their retirement, arguably one of the most important big-ticket items a person will ever own?

It always surprises me when people talk about their portfolio but have no clue as to what they are invested in.  They’ll often joke about it and make a comment about leaving it up to the professionals or that’s why they pay their stock broker/adviser the big bucks.

Let me ask you this:  Would you let the dealer pick out the car you’re going to purchase?  Or how about letting your real estate agent pick out your home?  Highly unlikely.  So why would you let anyone else have the last say on your retirement or investments?

Think about some of the reasons why you probably wouldn’t leave the decision-making up to a dealer or agent:

Perspective.  The fact that there are six – count’em, six! – cup holders may be a fabulous feature but not as high on your list of ‘Auto Must-Haves’ as it might be for the car-pool commuter.  An agent might find the school next door to be most convenient but your spouse working the night shift might disagree when trying to sleep during the day.  Different people are always going to have different opinions based on their unique personal perspective, especially when it comes down to the details.

Priorities.  The dealer may also not realize that you’d rather give up side air-bags for an extended warranty, even though you indicated that ‘safety’ was a priority.  An agent  might consider a view to be more valuable than a yard.  Many of us don’t even realize our own priorities until we start looking at options and are faced with making some decisions.

Cost.  It’s way easier to spend someone else’s money.  It’s also easier to take risks and overlook ‘minor’ issues when it’s not your buck.  The agent or dealer won’t have to live with the stiff clutch or the less-than-functional kitchen layout.  And if compensation is based on a percentage of price, they might not be as aggressive in negotiating the sale.  Always track the money chain.  Fee structure can often make a big difference in how much you end up actually paying for something.

Value.  No one will care as much about getting the best bang for your buck as you will.  These are your hard-earned dollars so it makes sense that you’ll want them to work as hard as you do (or harder!)  That’s why we usually take the time to shop around, to get the most value for the best price.  We each have a different cut-off point when we feel we have a good idea of the ‘going rate’ and are comfortable with the intrinsic value of the purchase.  The dealer or agent might only look at 2 or 3 options before making a decision.

Reliability.  Choices can be tough, either having too few or having too many.  It’s hard to know all the in’s and out’s of every product in every field and it can be even harder to slog through all the information out there and filter it down to manageable, suitable options.  That’s one of the reasons why we look to loan brokers, agents, lawyers and other professionals.  Hiring a specialist in the field and leveraging their knowledge and experience is usually well worth it.  But…

How reliable would you consider the data or opinion if the dealer/agent providing the information was also the owner of the car or property you are about to buy?

Don’t get me wrong.  I think it’s VERY important to seek professional assistance and advice, especially for infrequent, large and/or complex transactions.  But just like an auto dealer or real estate agent, their role is to give information, guidance, advice and support through the transaction.  You might decide to outsource some of the legwork but ultimately you need to make the final decisions.

All of these concepts apply when making any major decision, including investment and retirement planning.  If you leave all the decision-making up to someone else, you are basically at the mercy of their choices.  You don’t have to be an expert but you owe it to yourself to do a little research and have a basic understanding of the core concepts, even when you use a professional, so that you can effectively evaluate the information you are given and make informed decisions.

NOTE:  Many employer-sponsored retirement and 401k plans are limited to a few select investment funds but they usually include dollar-for-dollar matching contributions.  It’s hard to go wrong with free money!  Just be sure to monitor statements and fund performance, and discuss options or concerns with the fund manager.  Don’t forget ~ 401k accounts can normally be rolled over into an IRA when employment has ended.  Know where your funds are and what they’re doing!

Million Dollar Formula: Anyone Can Make a Million Dollars

I just read an article by Timothy McMahon, editor at Financial Trend Forecaster entitled All it Takes to Make a Million Dollars is Time, Consistency and Rate of Return.

McMahon shares some numbers and data to support this formula and it got me thinking about a pretty exciting reality:  Anyone can be a millionaire.

It’s true.  The tools are available, especially here in opportunity-rich North America, for anyone with a little bit of self-discipline and a willingness to learn.  A-a-a-a-and there’s the rub.  Despite having the key to the Million Dollar Formula, those two little characteristics make all the difference when it comes to WANTING a million dollars versus actually MAKING a million dollars.

Think about it.  We all know that a journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.  And then another and another, until we finally reach the destination.  We know the destination is there waiting for us even though we can’t see it.  We know that paths are available to get us there, sometimes many different routes. So why do so many of us never actually make it there?

Self-Discipline

It’s been said that ultimately we are the sum of our choices in life.  Nowhere is that more apparent than in our financial picture.  Good habits are the cornerstone of success but to develop them you have to be willing to prioritize and maybe even curb some indulgences along the way.

The ability to delay gratification is a huge struggle for most of us.  But it’s also your most powerful tool when it comes to money, saving and investing.  If CONSISTENCY is one of the keys to the Million Dollar Formula, then having a plan and a system can really help you balance and manage the process, as well as to stay focused on the end goal.  This is especially important when the goal is long-term, like retirement and the benefits can’t be seen or felt immediately.  Make it as easy as possible for yourself to be successful!

Temptation and accessibility are the silent saboteurs when it comes to your money and savings.  Take steps to make it harder to access your funds, like setting up a separate savings account that is NOT linked to your ATM card or locking up your credit cards (carry only one for true emergencies).  Choose to go to the park or beach instead of the mall.  Unsubscribe from magazines and emails with advertising and offers.  Keep pictures to remind yourself of the end-goal and track your progress so you have a visual representation of your success.

Treat your savings like an iron-clad fixed expense and take it off the top of each paycheck no matter when or how often it comes in.  YES, YOU CAN!  Remember, it’s about making choices.  Latte or $1M?  Eat out or $1M?  New car or $1M?  Every single indulgence is a choice you make that adds up and pushes your goal back a little further.  It’s not about doing without; it’s about priorities.  If you want to get to the Million Dollar Destination you have to make it a priority.  How quickly you get there depends on how high a priority you want (or need) to make it.

McMahon shares the math about the effects of Time and Consistency, along with an interesting thought:  “Even if you don’t have a (lump sum) nest egg you can retire a millionaire. Simply by saving $10 per day and investing it at 15% per year you will still reach Millionaire status in 25 years.  Is 25 years too long to save become a Millionaire? The average mortgage is 30 years!  So why are people willing to go in debt for 30 years but not save for 25 years?”

Willingness to Learn

People will often tell themselves that others have more opportunities, more cash, more luck or more whatever so that they can absolve themselves of any and all responsibility for their own success (or failure!) The truth is that we are each in charge of how we handle the people, things and events in our lives.

We are in the Digital Information Age.  There is information readily available on just about every possible topic you can think of, including money, finance and investing.  There are many paths to get to the Million Dollar Destination but not all of them will be right for you.  Taking time to read about different options and benefits will help you make informed decisions and more likely to avoid costly mistakes and setbacks.

Knowledge is power.  Even a child can understand the value of knowledge.  I asked my 13 year old son which he’d rather have:  A million dollars or the ability to make a million dollars.  He explained that, of course, knowing how to make a million would let him do it over and over again.  (But as we all know, knowing and doing are two completely different things – cue self-discipline!)

Are you familiar with the phrase, The rich get richer and the poor get poorer?  Knowledge and discipline really do make all the difference in the world.  McMahon shares this insight:

The Wealthy buy Assets; the Poor buy Liabilities; The Middle Class buy Liabilities believing they are Assets.

Knowing the difference between an asset and a liability is fundamental to building wealth.  Assets earn money and can appreciate in value; liabilities cost you and depreciate.  A rental home has the capacity to provide income and tax benefits AFTER covering its operating expenses, as well as the potential to appreciate in value.  Conversely, that boat you’re eyeing might provide hours of enjoyment and entertainment but it depreciates the minute you purchase and costs you every month for storage, gas, licensing, registration, maintenance and repairs.

As your funds grow, so will the temptation to spend and/or move them around.  It’s important to understand the pros and cons and the ins and outs of what you are invested in so that you can make informed decisions, regardless of whether it’s the stock market, real estate or any other asset class.   Rates of return vary greatly from product to product and every investment carries its own risk and parameters.  Again, there are many possible paths to get to the Million Dollar Destination so you need a basic understanding how they work to decide which is right for you.

Million Dollar Formula

So here it is again, the not-so-secret formula for anyone to make a million dollars:

Time + Consistency + Rate of Return = $1Million

Whether it’s the magic of compound interest or the brilliance of principal reduction, the sooner you start, the longer your funds have to work for you.

You have the Million Dollar Formula ~ The big question now is what are you going to do with it?

BTW, did you know that one of the best graduation or birthday gifts that you can give your kids is a ROTH IRA?  They may not fully appreciate it now but when it helps to pay for their college education or a down payment on a house, rest assured your kids will profusely thank and consider you a financial genius! 

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